Apex Legends Real Loot Box Robot
Gamer and engineer Graham Watson has been fascinated with loot boxes, and what better way than to build a robot modeled after the one found in Apex Legends? That’s exactly what he did, and Loot Tick was the result. This 2.5-foot-tall loot box not only walks, but even has LED lights to mimic the opening animation.



It features articulating servo motor-powered spider legs that enable it to walk, kick, or crouch, and of course the pyramid-shaped head, which has three LED lights on each side to mimic the loot box opening animation as mentioned previously. Plus, it trembles “fear” just like the in-game version right before opening. At the center of it all is a Raspberry Pi 4 computer running custom software.

ASUS TUF Gaming F17 Gaming Laptop, 17.3” FHD IPS-Type Display, Intel Core i5-10300H, GeForce GTX 1650 Ti, 8GB DDR4, 512GB PCIe SSD, RGB Keyboard, Windows 10, Bonfire Black, FX706LI-RS53
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ASUS TUF Gaming F17 Gaming Laptop, 17.3” FHD IPS-Type Display, Intel Core i5-10300H, GeForce GTX 1650 Ti, 8GB DDR4, 512GB PCIe SSD, RGB Keyboard, Windows 10, Bonfire Black, FX706LI-RS53
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Ti 4GB GDDR6 Graphics up to 1585MHz at 80W TGP
  • Quad-core Intel Core 15-10300H Processor (8M Cache, up to 4.5 GHz, 4 cores)
  • 17.3” Full HD (1920x1080) IPS-Type display
  • 512GB PCIe NVMe M.2 SSD | 8GB DDR4 2933MHz RAM
  • Durable MIL-STD-810H military standard construction

I wanted this thing to be as true to the game as physically possible, but obviously the loot bot in the game was never designed to be something that exists in real life. It’s only designed to look as cool as possible, not actually account for motors or servos, joints, electronics, gravity, physics, etc,” said Watson.

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